What's in a name? Why these proteins are intrinsically disordered: Why these proteins are intrinsically disordered

A Keith Dunker, M Madan Babu, Elisar Barbar, Martin Blackledge, Sarah E Bondos, Zsuzsanna Dosztányi, H Jane Dyson, Julie Forman-Kay, Monika Fuxreiter, Jörg Gsponer, Kyou-Hoon Han, David T Jones, Sonia Longhi, Steven J Metallo, Ken Nishikawa, Ruth Nussinov, Zoran Obradovic, Rohit V Pappu, Burkhard Rost, Philipp SelenkoVinod Subramaniam, Joel L Sussman, Peter Tompa, Vladimir N Uversky

    Research output: Contribution to JournalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    "What's in a name? That which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet." From "Romeo and Juliet", William Shakespeare (1594) This article opens a series of publications on disambiguation of the basic terms used in the field of intrinsically disordered proteins. We start from the beginning, namely from the explanation of what the expression "intrinsically disordered protein" actually means and why this particular term has been chosen as the common denominator for this class of proteins characterized by broad structural, dynamic and functional characteristics.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)e24157
    JournalIntrinsically disordered proteins
    Volume1
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2013

    Keywords

    • Journal Article
    • Review

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