Wheelchair mobility performance enhancement by changing wheelchair properties: What is the effect of grip, seat height, and mass?

Rienk M.A. Van Der Slikke, Annemarie M.H. De Witte, Monique A.M. Berger, Daan J.J. Bregman, Dirk Jan H.E.J. Veeger

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To provide insight on the effect of wheelchair settings on wheelchair mobility performance (WMP). Methods: Twenty elite wheelchair basketball athletes of low (n = 10) and high classification (n = 10) were tested in a wheelchair-basketball-directed field test. Athletes performed the test in their own wheelchairs, whichweremodified for 5 additional conditions regarding seat height (high-low), mass (central-distributed), and grip. The previously developed inertial-sensor-basedWMPmonitor was used to extract wheelchair kinematics in all conditions. Results: Adding mass showed most effect on WMP, with a reduced average acceleration across all activities. Once distributed, additional mass also reduced maximal rotational speed and rotational acceleration. Elevating seat height had an effect on several performance aspects in sprinting and turning, whereas lowering seat height influenced performance minimally. Increased rim grip did not alter performance. No differences in response were evident between low- and high-classified athletes. Conclusions: The WMP monitor showed sensitivity to detect performance differences due to the small changes in wheelchair configuration. Distributed additional mass had the most effect onWMP, whereas additional grip had the least effect of conditions tested. Performance effects appear similar for both low- and high-classified athletes. Athletes, coaches, and wheelchair experts are provided with insight into the performance effect of key wheelchair settings, and they are offered a proven sensitive method to apply in sport practice, in their search for the best wheelchair-athlete combination.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1050-1058
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

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Wheelchairs
Hand Strength
Athletes
Basketball
Biomechanical Phenomena
Sports

Keywords

  • Classification
  • Paralympic sports
  • Wheelchair basketball

Cite this

Van Der Slikke, Rienk M.A. ; De Witte, Annemarie M.H. ; Berger, Monique A.M. ; Bregman, Daan J.J. ; Veeger, Dirk Jan H.E.J. / Wheelchair mobility performance enhancement by changing wheelchair properties : What is the effect of grip, seat height, and mass?. In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 8. pp. 1050-1058.
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Wheelchair mobility performance enhancement by changing wheelchair properties : What is the effect of grip, seat height, and mass? / Van Der Slikke, Rienk M.A.; De Witte, Annemarie M.H.; Berger, Monique A.M.; Bregman, Daan J.J.; Veeger, Dirk Jan H.E.J.

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 13, No. 8, 01.09.2018, p. 1050-1058.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T2 - What is the effect of grip, seat height, and mass?

AU - Van Der Slikke, Rienk M.A.

AU - De Witte, Annemarie M.H.

AU - Berger, Monique A.M.

AU - Bregman, Daan J.J.

AU - Veeger, Dirk Jan H.E.J.

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