When you don't quite get what you want: Psychological and interpersonal consequences of claiming inclusion.

Wendy de Waal-Andrews, Ilja Van Beest

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    People’s success or failure to gain inclusion in groups may result from their own actions or the actions of others. Two studies compared the personal and interpersonal consequences of inclusion and exclusion when they resulted from these two processes. People’s own failure to “claim” inclusion in a computerized ballgame was equally detrimental for fundamental needs and made people equally unlikely to behave prosocially to group members, as being denied inclusion by others. In contrast, the beneficial effects of inclusion depended on the process with which it was obtained, and meta-perceptions of warmth mediated these differences; people who succeeded to claim inclusion thought their interaction partners liked them less than people who were granted inclusion, and as a result, their fundamental needs were satisfied less, and they behaved less prosocially.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1367-1377
    Number of pages11
    JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
    Volume38
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Keywords

    • Social inclusion/exclusion
    • Ostracism
    • Belonging
    • Warmth
    • Well-being

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