Who do we inform? The role of status and target in intergroup whistle-blowing

E.P.C. Hopman, E.A.C. van Leeuwen

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    175 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    In two experiments (n = 87 and n = 90), we showed that strongly identifying members of a low status group are more likely to actively inform the ingroup rather than the outgroup about an outgroup transgression, and consider it as more loyal to the ingroup to do so. Moreover, strongly identifying members of a high status group are more likely to actively inform the outgroup rather than the ingroup about an outgroup transgression, and consider this to be more loyal to the ingroup. The results are in support of the notion that, depending on a group's existing status position, negative outgroup information can be used to enhance or confirm the ingroup's standing, affecting whether the ingroup or the outgroup will initially be informed about an outgroup transgression. Copyright © The Author(s), 2009.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)605-618
    JournalGroup Processes and Intergroup Relations
    Volume12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Who do we inform? The role of status and target in intergroup whistle-blowing'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this