Whose Innovation Performance Benefits More from External Networks: Entrepreneurial or Conservative Firms

W. Baker, A. Grinstein, N. Harmancioglu

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The primary contribution of this research is positing and empirically supporting the proposition that learning through external networks disproportionately benefits conservative, risk-averse firms. The construct, entrepreneurial orientation (EO), is used to discriminate conservative, risk-averse firms from proactive, risk-seeking firms. Organizational learning theory and social capital theory are employed to support our hypotheses. Based on a study of 1978 U.S. firms, the paper suggests that the utilization of external networks (i.e., the process of learning from information, perspectives, and insights embedded in external networks) may act as a primary driver for innovation for those firms that are either not inclined and/or do not have the capabilities to adopt entrepreneurial culture. Specifically, weak EO firms' innovation performance benefits from utilizing external networks more than strong EO firms'. This research also tests for the moderating role of firm size and finds that the negative moderating effect of EO on the external network utilization-innovation performance relationship is more pronounced in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) than large firms.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)104-120
JournalJournal of Product Innovation Management
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Innovation
Innovation performance
Entrepreneurial networks
Industry
Entrepreneurial orientation
Risk-averse

Cite this

@article{d486ae05c2ff444ab0ee6f5fe019250e,
title = "Whose Innovation Performance Benefits More from External Networks: Entrepreneurial or Conservative Firms",
abstract = "The primary contribution of this research is positing and empirically supporting the proposition that learning through external networks disproportionately benefits conservative, risk-averse firms. The construct, entrepreneurial orientation (EO), is used to discriminate conservative, risk-averse firms from proactive, risk-seeking firms. Organizational learning theory and social capital theory are employed to support our hypotheses. Based on a study of 1978 U.S. firms, the paper suggests that the utilization of external networks (i.e., the process of learning from information, perspectives, and insights embedded in external networks) may act as a primary driver for innovation for those firms that are either not inclined and/or do not have the capabilities to adopt entrepreneurial culture. Specifically, weak EO firms' innovation performance benefits from utilizing external networks more than strong EO firms'. This research also tests for the moderating role of firm size and finds that the negative moderating effect of EO on the external network utilization-innovation performance relationship is more pronounced in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) than large firms.",
author = "W. Baker and A. Grinstein and N. Harmancioglu",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1111/jpim.12263",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "104--120",
journal = "Journal of Product Innovation Management",
issn = "0737-6782",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

Whose Innovation Performance Benefits More from External Networks: Entrepreneurial or Conservative Firms. / Baker, W.; Grinstein, A.; Harmancioglu, N.

In: Journal of Product Innovation Management, Vol. 33, No. 1, 2016, p. 104-120.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Whose Innovation Performance Benefits More from External Networks: Entrepreneurial or Conservative Firms

AU - Baker, W.

AU - Grinstein, A.

AU - Harmancioglu, N.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - The primary contribution of this research is positing and empirically supporting the proposition that learning through external networks disproportionately benefits conservative, risk-averse firms. The construct, entrepreneurial orientation (EO), is used to discriminate conservative, risk-averse firms from proactive, risk-seeking firms. Organizational learning theory and social capital theory are employed to support our hypotheses. Based on a study of 1978 U.S. firms, the paper suggests that the utilization of external networks (i.e., the process of learning from information, perspectives, and insights embedded in external networks) may act as a primary driver for innovation for those firms that are either not inclined and/or do not have the capabilities to adopt entrepreneurial culture. Specifically, weak EO firms' innovation performance benefits from utilizing external networks more than strong EO firms'. This research also tests for the moderating role of firm size and finds that the negative moderating effect of EO on the external network utilization-innovation performance relationship is more pronounced in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) than large firms.

AB - The primary contribution of this research is positing and empirically supporting the proposition that learning through external networks disproportionately benefits conservative, risk-averse firms. The construct, entrepreneurial orientation (EO), is used to discriminate conservative, risk-averse firms from proactive, risk-seeking firms. Organizational learning theory and social capital theory are employed to support our hypotheses. Based on a study of 1978 U.S. firms, the paper suggests that the utilization of external networks (i.e., the process of learning from information, perspectives, and insights embedded in external networks) may act as a primary driver for innovation for those firms that are either not inclined and/or do not have the capabilities to adopt entrepreneurial culture. Specifically, weak EO firms' innovation performance benefits from utilizing external networks more than strong EO firms'. This research also tests for the moderating role of firm size and finds that the negative moderating effect of EO on the external network utilization-innovation performance relationship is more pronounced in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) than large firms.

U2 - 10.1111/jpim.12263

DO - 10.1111/jpim.12263

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 104

EP - 120

JO - Journal of Product Innovation Management

JF - Journal of Product Innovation Management

SN - 0737-6782

IS - 1

ER -