Workers' Health Surveillance in the Meat Processing Industry: Work and Health Indicators Associated with Work Ability

B.J. van Holland, R. Soer, M.R. de Boer, M.F. Reneman, S. Brouwer

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background Workers’ health surveillance (WHS) programs commonly measure a large number of indicators addressing health habits and health risks. Recently, work ability and functional capacity have been included as important risk measures in WHS. In order to address work ability appropriately, knowledge of associations with work and health measures is necessary. The objective of this study was to evaluate which of the factors measured in a WHS are independently associated with work ability in a group of meat processing workers. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in a large meat processing company in The Netherlands. Data were collected during a WHS between February 2012 and March 2014. Personal characteristics, health habits and health-risk indicators, functional capacity, and work-related factors were measured. Work ability was measured with the Work Ability Index and was used as dependent variable. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted, a receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. Results Data sets from 230 employees were used for analyses. The average age was 53Â years and the average work ability index score was 39.3. In the final multivariable model age (OR 0.94), systolic blood pressure (OR 1.03), need for recovery (OR 0.56), and overhead work capacity (OR 3.95) contributed significantly. The AUC for this model was 0.81 (95Â % CI 0.75–0.86). Conclusion Findings from the current study indicate that multifactorial outcomes (age, systolic blood pressure, need for recovery, and overhead work capacity) from a WHS were independently associated with work ability. These factors can be used to assess employees at risk for low work ability and might provide directions for interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)618-626
JournalJournal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Aptitude
Meat
Industry
Health
Blood Pressure
Habits
Area Under Curve
ROC Curve
Netherlands
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Cite this

@article{56ee0d6a5d9247f99990f366b2a355f1,
title = "Workers' Health Surveillance in the Meat Processing Industry: Work and Health Indicators Associated with Work Ability",
abstract = "Background Workers’ health surveillance (WHS) programs commonly measure a large number of indicators addressing health habits and health risks. Recently, work ability and functional capacity have been included as important risk measures in WHS. In order to address work ability appropriately, knowledge of associations with work and health measures is necessary. The objective of this study was to evaluate which of the factors measured in a WHS are independently associated with work ability in a group of meat processing workers. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in a large meat processing company in The Netherlands. Data were collected during a WHS between February 2012 and March 2014. Personal characteristics, health habits and health-risk indicators, functional capacity, and work-related factors were measured. Work ability was measured with the Work Ability Index and was used as dependent variable. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted, a receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. Results Data sets from 230 employees were used for analyses. The average age was 53{\^A} years and the average work ability index score was 39.3. In the final multivariable model age (OR 0.94), systolic blood pressure (OR 1.03), need for recovery (OR 0.56), and overhead work capacity (OR 3.95) contributed significantly. The AUC for this model was 0.81 (95{\^A} {\%} CI 0.75–0.86). Conclusion Findings from the current study indicate that multifactorial outcomes (age, systolic blood pressure, need for recovery, and overhead work capacity) from a WHS were independently associated with work ability. These factors can be used to assess employees at risk for low work ability and might provide directions for interventions.",
author = "{van Holland}, B.J. and R. Soer and {de Boer}, M.R. and M.F. Reneman and S. Brouwer",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1007/s10926-015-9569-2",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
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Workers' Health Surveillance in the Meat Processing Industry: Work and Health Indicators Associated with Work Ability. / van Holland, B.J.; Soer, R.; de Boer, M.R.; Reneman, M.F.; Brouwer, S.

In: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, Vol. 25, No. 3, 2015, p. 618-626.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Workers' Health Surveillance in the Meat Processing Industry: Work and Health Indicators Associated with Work Ability

AU - van Holland, B.J.

AU - Soer, R.

AU - de Boer, M.R.

AU - Reneman, M.F.

AU - Brouwer, S.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Background Workers’ health surveillance (WHS) programs commonly measure a large number of indicators addressing health habits and health risks. Recently, work ability and functional capacity have been included as important risk measures in WHS. In order to address work ability appropriately, knowledge of associations with work and health measures is necessary. The objective of this study was to evaluate which of the factors measured in a WHS are independently associated with work ability in a group of meat processing workers. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in a large meat processing company in The Netherlands. Data were collected during a WHS between February 2012 and March 2014. Personal characteristics, health habits and health-risk indicators, functional capacity, and work-related factors were measured. Work ability was measured with the Work Ability Index and was used as dependent variable. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted, a receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. Results Data sets from 230 employees were used for analyses. The average age was 53Â years and the average work ability index score was 39.3. In the final multivariable model age (OR 0.94), systolic blood pressure (OR 1.03), need for recovery (OR 0.56), and overhead work capacity (OR 3.95) contributed significantly. The AUC for this model was 0.81 (95Â % CI 0.75–0.86). Conclusion Findings from the current study indicate that multifactorial outcomes (age, systolic blood pressure, need for recovery, and overhead work capacity) from a WHS were independently associated with work ability. These factors can be used to assess employees at risk for low work ability and might provide directions for interventions.

AB - Background Workers’ health surveillance (WHS) programs commonly measure a large number of indicators addressing health habits and health risks. Recently, work ability and functional capacity have been included as important risk measures in WHS. In order to address work ability appropriately, knowledge of associations with work and health measures is necessary. The objective of this study was to evaluate which of the factors measured in a WHS are independently associated with work ability in a group of meat processing workers. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in a large meat processing company in The Netherlands. Data were collected during a WHS between February 2012 and March 2014. Personal characteristics, health habits and health-risk indicators, functional capacity, and work-related factors were measured. Work ability was measured with the Work Ability Index and was used as dependent variable. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted, a receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. Results Data sets from 230 employees were used for analyses. The average age was 53Â years and the average work ability index score was 39.3. In the final multivariable model age (OR 0.94), systolic blood pressure (OR 1.03), need for recovery (OR 0.56), and overhead work capacity (OR 3.95) contributed significantly. The AUC for this model was 0.81 (95Â % CI 0.75–0.86). Conclusion Findings from the current study indicate that multifactorial outcomes (age, systolic blood pressure, need for recovery, and overhead work capacity) from a WHS were independently associated with work ability. These factors can be used to assess employees at risk for low work ability and might provide directions for interventions.

U2 - 10.1007/s10926-015-9569-2

DO - 10.1007/s10926-015-9569-2

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 618

EP - 626

JO - Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation

JF - Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation

SN - 1053-0487

IS - 3

ER -